Ambassador to the BREED Award

August 14, 2014

The American Boer Goat Association honored 16 people with Ambassador to the Bred Award at the Annual Members Banquet that took place during the 20th Anniversary ABGA National Show.

The Recipients of the 2014 Awards are:

  • Buck Pruitt
  • Jimmy Day
  • Kim Halfmann
  • Sammy Helmers
  • Don Jackman
  • Stan Keen
  • Norman Kohls
  • Mike Masters (Deceased)
  • Jane Meacham
  • Dian Newman
  • Lou Nuti
  • Ernest Schwarts
  • Mary Powis
  • Walter Pope III (Deceased)
  • Charles Turner
  • E. Whitehead

The Ambassador to the Breed Award was initiated by the ABGA Board of Directors in 2012 to honor people who the association believes have made an impact on the goat industry. In addition to receiving an ABGA bronze, the recipients’ names are placed on a plaque that resides in the ABGA office. They are also listed on the Ambassadors to the Breed page on the ABGA website.

Dr. Lous Nuti, recipient of the 2014 Breed Award

Dr. Lous Nuti and Buck Pruitt, recipients of the 2014 Breed Award

The first awards were given in 2013 and went to Dr. Frank Pinkerton, Marvin Shurley, the Kearney Family, and Dr. Frank Craddock.

Buck Pruitt and Dr. Lou Nuti both attended this year’s banquet and received their awards in person. The 16 individuals who received 2014 awards are those who first realized the full impact the South African Boer goat could have on the U.S. goat industry. They had the foresight and vision to enable them to put their personal differences aside and begin the work that would lead to the formation of the American Boer Goat Association.


REAP 2014, “Sowing Into Your Future”

August 1, 2014

REAP participantsThe Research Extension Apprentice Program (REAP) has just come to a close after 2 weeks of learning, fun, relationship-building, and skill development. REAP is a program for high school juniors and seniors that are interested in Agriculture and/or Human Sciences. The program is 2 weeks long and provides on-campus room and board for the students along with conducting many fun and educational activities. The goal of the program is to educate students in research and extension related topics in a fun and interactive way, and motivate them to pursue a career in Agriculture or Human Sciences.

From June 15th to June 27th, the students attended a series of workshops and activities that were designed to teach the students skills that can help them be more efficient and maximize their potential and introduce them to some of the basics of Agriculture and Human Sciences. They discussed topics such as, the power of meditation, basic nutrition, the benefits of juicing, the power of forgiveness, and effective time management. The students also attended curriculum oriented seminars conducted by CARC researchers and scientists where they learned the basics of different agriculture and human sciences. They learned about chemistry, different types of soils, natural resources, environmental systems, hydrology, veterinary medicine, growth and development of livestock animals, and more.

The students were also able to visit the George Bush Library in College Station where they toured the museum and learned about former President George H. W. Bush. They also took a trip to Peckerwood Gardens in Hempstead where they were able to observe several different types of rare and uncommon plants.

The program came to an end on June 27th with a closing program for the students, parents, faculty, and staff in which the students were able to give emotional speeches and reflect about their experience in the program. The closing program also featured speeches from faculty and staff members of CEP and CAHS including a motivational speech from Dean of CAHS, Dr. Alton B. Johnson. Some of the students also took turns as Master of Ceremonies, and some entertained the crowd with dance and spoken word performances.

REAP 2014 turned out to be a success, and all the participants enjoyed their experience and their time at PVAMU. They all left with new friends and new skills to help them stay motivated and be successful and attend college, hopefully, at PVAMU CAHS.

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More photos from the REAP 2014 event can be found at the CAHS Facebook and Instagram pages

By Jakari Bates

Visit us online at www.pvamu.edu/cahs


CAHS Student Gets $125,000 Scholarship

August 1, 2014

RaymondThomasOne of the 2014 USDA/1890 Scholars Program recipients will be attending the College of Agriculture and Human Sciences (CAHS) at Prairie View this fall. Mr. Raymond Thomas is one of the most recent scholars to be accepted into the USDA/1890 Scholars Program, and he has chosen Prairie View A&M University as the 1890 institution at which he will pursue his education.

The USDA/1890 Scholars Program offers scholarships to students who are seeking a bachelor’s degree at one of the eighteen 1890 Land-Grant Institutions in any field related to agriculture, food, natural resource sciences. Each award provides annual tuition, employment, and covers the costs of room and board, books, and fees through 4 academic years, plus a requirement to work in the Student Educational Employment Program, and is valued at $125,000. The scholarship is renewed annually, but renewal is contingent upon satisfactory performance and progress toward completing the degree plan. Upon receiving their bachelor’s degrees, USDA/1890 Scholars have an obligation of 1 year of service to the USDA for each year of financial support they have received. The USDA/1890 Scholars Program also includes opportunities for paid internships with the USDA in different cities throughout the 4 year scholarship period.

Mr. Thomas is only the second USDA/1890 Scholar to attend PVAMU. He will be attending Prairie View in the fall of 2014 in CAHS majoring in agricultural economics. He chose to attend Prairie View mainly because his father attended and his older brother is also currently a student. He became more familiar with CAHS and the field of agriculture when he attended the 2013 REAP program where he also learned about the USDA/1890 Scholars Program. He has also received a $10,000 departmental scholarship through CAHS to supplement the USDA scholarship.

Raymond is very excited about starting his college career. He has been interested in agriculture since he joined the Boy Scouts at around 5 years old. He remained an active member of the Boy Scouts throughout his primary and secondary education where he achieved the rank of Eagle Scout. Being a scout developed his interests and appreciation for the environment and agriculture through extensive outdoor camping. He chose PVAMU because of the close, family-like environment amongst the students, faculty, and staff. He also feels that Prairie View has the adequate resources and dedication to ensure his success earning his Bachelor’s degree. Raymond is interested in pursuing a career working for the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) within the USDA upon graduation. With a career with NASS, he can satisfy his passion for agriculture with his passion for mathematics and crunching numbers.

By Jakari Bates

Visit us online at www.pvamu.edu/cahs


PVAMU MANRRS recognizes Hodge and Jones

May 6, 2014

The members of the Prairie View A&M University MANRRS (Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences) Chapter recognized Mr. Horace Hodge, USDA/1890 Program Liaison and Dr. Wash Jones, Assistant Professor, CAHS during a special meeting on April 26th.

Ms. Rose Marie Somers 2013/2013 President and Mr. Christopher Wong, 2014/2015 President officially presented Dr. Jones and Mr. Hodge an “Appreciation Award” for their dedication, commitment and mentorship during the 2013/2014 school year.

MANRRS Recognition

Dr. Wash Jones and Mr. Horace Hodge share a photo at a MANRRS meeting called to recognize their dedication, commitment and mentorship.

Both recipients thank the members as indicated below:

Jones said “Thank you tremendously for the surprise honor/recognition given to Mr. Hodge and me this week. I really appreciate your thoughtfulness, and it lets me know that our work is not in vain. MANRRS means a great deal to me, and I desire to do my best to help all members thrive to success and excellence. It’s a joy working with all of you and seeing you move toward excellence. Thanks a million!”

Mr. Hodge presented the following comments: “I want to thank each of you personally and as a group for the beautiful award. It was quite a surprise and very humbling. It is certainly a pleasure to work with the PVAMU MANRRS chapter and beside a very dedicated and committed primary advisor, Dr. Wash Jones. Having been associated with the PVAMU MANRRS Chapter since its inception, I know “The Best is Yet to Come”.

I am looking forward to a great 2014/2015 school year.


Agriculture students excel at 2014 National MANRRS Conference

April 7, 2014

Christopher Wong and Robert Woodie McClennon Jr., College of Agriculture and Human Sciences (CAHS) students, received accolades at the 29th Annual National Career Fair and Training Conference of the Society for Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) March 27-29 in Birmingham, AL.

Wong won 1st Place and a $300 monetary award in the Undergraduate Research Poster Contest for his research on “The Effect of Heat Treatment on Oil Absorption of Agricultural Fibers.” He conducted his research as a Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU) Honors Program student during a 2013 summer research program at North Dakota State University. Wong is a sophomore agriculture major with a concentration in agronomy.

McClennon won 2nd Place and a $200 monetary award in the Impromptu Public Speaking Contest for his discussion of the following question: “Across the country, some 23 million Americans live in inner city and rural locales where the scarcity of supermarkets drives people to convenience stores, pharmacies and fast food restaurants as their vendors of first resort. What programs should be implemented to promote broad based access to healthy food across different socio economic groups?” McClennon advanced to the national competition after winning 1st Place in the MANRRS Regional Competition in Austin, Texas, in October 2013. He is a senior agriculture major with a concentration in animal science.

The two students were among eight PVAMU students attending the conference which included approximately 850 representatives from government, industry and higher education institutions around the United States. The 2015 MANRRS Conference will be hosted March 26-28 in Houston.

2014 MANRRS Contest Winners

2014 MANRRS Contest Winners Christopher Wong, left, and Robert McClennon Jr., right.


25% of College Students Infected??

April 4, 2014

std-awareness-month-size

Panthers United is a campus recognized student organization, supported by the College of Agriculture and Human Sciences (CAHS). The organization’s primary focus is to exemplify leadership while impacting the lives of limited resource families through support and service to Prairie View A&M University and the local community. Panthers United has undergone several major transitions over the years. It has recently elected new leadership as well as a new advisor; a Program Specialist within the CAHS. In the past three semesters, Panthers United has accomplished many programming and service goals. Currently, the organization is in the process of planning their activities for the 2014-2015 school year. Programs of interest for next year include a reading program with Jones Elementary School and free technology classes for senior citizens.

Alexandria and Gabrielle with STD Awareness Campaign.

Alexandria and Gabrielle with STD Awareness Campaign.

Did you know that 25% of college students in the U.S. are infected with an STD?

In collaboration with Prairie View Student Nurse Association, Panthers United, hosted an information booth referred to as “Candy and Condoms” in the Memorial Student Center on March 31, 2014. Student leaders, Gabrielle Scott, Committee Captain-Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Awareness, and Alexandria Hall, Vice President, successfully guided the organization so that the booth attracted over 100 individuals. The information booth provided general STD education, resources for common STDs and prevention tips to reduce transmission. Recent statistics report that in the U.S., 25% of college students are infected with an STD. Sexually transmitted diseases on campus are becoming a major problem and the issue is not getting the coverage and attention that it deserves.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the most common STD on college campuses is Chlamydia, Genital Herpes and Human Papillomavirus (HPV); when HPV does not go away, it can cause genital warts as well as cervical cancer. With nearly one in every 5 students infected with an STD on campus, it is important that student organizations, like Panthers United, to take the initiative and provide awareness and empower students to think twice before engaging in risky behaviors. Please take a moment to congratulate Panthers United for their continued efforts in supporting the CAHS vision of meeting needs and changing lives.

Click here to visit Panthers United on Facebook!

Click here to visit Panthers United on Facebook!

 

Remember: It’s not who you are but what you do that puts you at risk of contracting an STD

 

 

 

 

 

DanielleHairstonGreenBy Danielle Y. Hairston Green,
Program Specialist, Family and Consumer Sciences
Cooperative Extension Program

Visit us online at www.pvamu.edu/cahs


Natural Hair, Nutrition, and Coconut Oil?

April 3, 2014
Danielle and Domonique

Natural hair experience!What’s On Your Plate Today? (April Edition)

What’s On Your Plate? (April Edition)

I spent a few years debating if I wanted to allow my hair to go natural or not.  My daughter has always been natural and my mother wore her hair natural for several years. I’ve always been completely fascinated by those who were brave enough to take that leap. Just recently I decided to give it a try. After a year of not chemically processing my hair it has turned out beautiful. I’ve been on the internet for weeks trying to find the best product for my “new” natural hair.  At the same time my daughter was looking for ingredients to make homemade lipsticks. How ironic that we stumbled across the same product that works for both; coconut oil, and it was in the food section of Walmart. Really?

Of course my curiosity has been peaked and I wanted to find out if there were any significant health benefits of coconut oil. This is what I have discovered. According to some websites including Organic Facts, there are several health benefits of organic coconut oil and those benefits include “hair care, skin care, stress relief (now that is interesting), cholesterol level maintenance, weight loss, boosted immune system, proper digestion and regulated metabolism”. What’s really interesting is that in the 70’s coconut oil was considered pretty harmful for the human body due to its high saturated fat content until about ten years ago when those claims were questioned.

According to research conducted by Dr. Lita Lee, coconut oil was used as cooking oil for thousands of years until the anti-saturated fat campaign. The Wall Street Journal published an article that quoted Dr. Glen D. Lawrence, chemistry and biochemistry professor, stating that coconut oils appeal to consumer is because it has “medium chain fatty acids,” which is a designation that relates to the number of carbon atoms in the fat. According to Dr. Lawrence most of the foods Americans consume have long-chain fatty acids.coconut

The USDA has indicated that for nutritional purposes coconut oil should be considered a solid fat since it is high in saturated or trans fatty acids. Although there are opposing views about the nutritional health benefits of coconut oil many sites have supported that coconut oil (filled with antioxidant benefits and vitamin E) is GREAT for the hair; nourishment, shine, and overall health. Check out the sites below and let me know what your thoughts are about coconut oil and its nutritional value.

 

 

DanielleHairstonGreenBy Danielle Y. Hairston Green,
Program Specialist, Family and Consumer Sciences
Cooperative Extension Program

Visit us online at www.pvamu.edu/cahs

 

 

References

Organic Facts http://www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/health-benefits-of-coconut-oil.html

Wall Street Journal http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304418404579469762543729116

Choose My Plate http://www.choosemyplate.gov/food-groups/oils.html

 


Texas Sustainable Strawberry Production

March 31, 2014

strawberryPrairie View A&M Unversity’s Cooperative Extension Program along with the Cooperative Agricultural Research Center in the College of Agriculture and Human Sciences is partnering with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension to conduct research on ways to increase the production of strawberries, a highly valued commodity, in Texas. This project is being funded by a one-year grant from the National Strawberry Sustainability Initiative funded by the Wal-Mart Foundation and administered by the University of Arkansas Center for Agricultural and Rural Sustainability.  The university farm at Prairie View is just one of several project locations that have been set up around the State to utilize both university research facilities and the resources of farmer’s sites in the community.

The project is evaluating a number of different variables such as locations within the State, different varieties growing in fields vs. high tunnels, plastic culture, row covers, and organic production. One of the primary objectives of the project is to uncover some of the common problems a producer is likely to experience growing strawberries in a given region of the state; then document these issues along with recommended solutions increasing the likelihood of success once the producer goes into production.

Very few strawberries are produced locally in Texas and most are imported from California or Mexico making them very expensive for local consumers.  Fact is, strawberries are a very attractive, “high value”, alternative crop for Texas producers.  With high value also comes “high risk”. One of the goals of this project is to identify the production risk associated with growing strawberries and develop production practices that mitigate the risk.  As this project develops, coordinators will be seeking to recruit more producers to participate in the project.

Follow this project on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/texasstrawberryproject

Billy Lawton By Billy Lawton,
Program Leader, Agriculture and Natural Resources
Cooperative Extension Program

Visit us online at www.pvamu.edu/cahs


PV Livestock Club Demonstrates Outstanding Performance

February 8, 2014

FWLSR2In the first time that Prairie View A&M University has competed at the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo in the Dairy Goat Competition, Prairie View’s Livestock Club members Robert “Woodie” McClennon, Theo Reed and Bryce Peterson, along with advisors Scott Horner and Dwight Rhodes brought home 1 reserve champion and 3 champion ribbons.  The winning goats were a 7 year old Alpine milking doe named Agalea, shown by Brice Peterson; a 2 year old Alpine milking doe named Bree, shown by Woodie McClennon; and a dry yearling Alpine named Caryn also shown by Woodie McClennon.  The team also showed the second place best 3 females in the show that had over 200 goats competing.

Following through on the partnership with Dallas County’s DeSoto Independent School District via the One Kid at a Time project was the project’s lead principal investigator, Dr. Joice Jeffries, standing on the side lines  to cheer on both the DeSoto students and the PVAM youth that were participating at the Fort Worth show. The Livestock Club worked closely with the students from the DeSoto ISD middle school, mentoring the youth that are participants in the One Kid At a Time Project. Club members helped the youth with the final show preparation,  grooming of their goats and worked with them to show how best to exhibit their animals.  The middle school youth fared well, showing their goats to many middle and upper class placings in a very competitive show.


Invest In Yourself

September 9, 2013

invest-in-yourself-thumbnailWhat does it take to start a business, live a healthy lifestyle, have a great career, achieve financial peace or gain the skills needed for success? The correct answer is YOU! Believe it or not you are your greatest asset. Merriam-Webster defines an asset as something of value that is owned.  That means that you already have it within you. The term “asset” also includes synonyms such as advantage and resource. The key to maximizing your potential as your own personal asset is to invest in yourself. Benjamin Franklin once said, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest”. Investing in the stock market is a great opportunity for success, but what about the individuals that do not know whether or not they are facing a bear or bull market? Returns can be uncertain, but the beauty of investing in yourself is that internally you have the aptitude to produce abundant returns in every aspect of your life.

6 ways to Invest In Yourself

  1. Gain Experience: If you are thinking about starting a business or changing careers the best way to invest in yourself is to gain experience in your field. It is much easier to obtain business financing for a new business if you have “skin in the game.” If you are thinking about one day opening a bakery try working at a local bakery so that you can get experience in the field and also learn the ends and outs of owning a bakery. Gaining experience beforehand also helps you to understand what pitfalls to avoid.
  2. Ask Questions: Research the type of business that you would like to own. Getting information on permits and prices on starting a daycare will be of course hard to get from a local daycare owner. However, scheduling a visit with a daycare 75 miles up the road that is not your competition will prove to be very insightful. You will be surprised at how much help other small business owners are willing to give if you just ask. They may even decide to be your mentor.
  3. Go to class: This phrase is not just for students it’s for adults too! Whatever you are most passionate about it could be cooking, decorating or makeup. Check out local organizations such as community colleges that offer classes in courses that you are interested in. If you are thinking about starting a business or have a struggling business your local community college may offer a 3 hour class such as marketing or accounting that will be beneficial. Starting a small business involves money and time, investing in either requires an understanding of where they are going now and in the future. Many organizations such as Texas A & M AgriLife Extension provide classes at little to no cost on various topics such as agriculture, healthy eating, childcare, and small business development.
  4. Relax and Workout: It is so easy to get caught in everyday life that we fail to sit down and take care of ourselves. Working out can reduce a lot of stress. Activities such as Yoga or a brisk 30 minute walk can not only help alleviate stress, but help to avoid an increase in weight and the health consequences that come along with it.
  5. Set goals: If you have dreams of owning your own business or house within the next few years write it down as a long term goal and then put under it the short term goals need to get there.
  6. Save now: Everything from back to school shopping, to a family vacation or opening a business involves savings. Many banks and credit unions offer vacation and Christmas savings accounts that allow you to save up for those expenses so you won’t be stressed out about it at the last minute. A good idea is to complete a 52 week challenge. The 52 week challenge involves putting $1 on week one in a savings account, $2 in week w and so forth. By the end of 52 weeks you will have saved $1,378.

If you would like more information on how you can get started in investing in yourself or if you know of a class that you feel will benefit your community Contact Winnefred Jackson. She can be reached by email at wijackson@pvamu.edu or by the office phone (936)334-3230. Winnefred Jackson is the new Community and Economic Development Prairie View Cooperative Extension Program (A Division of Texas AgriLife Extension) County Extension Agent for Liberty County. She holds a Masters of Business Administration from Prairie View A & M University and a Bachelors of Business Administration from Baylor University.

WinnefredJackson By Winnefred Jackson,
Liberty County Extension Agent, Community and Economic Development
Cooperative Extension Program

Visit us online at www.pvamu.edu/cahs